100 Years of New Media Pedagogy

Jason Palmeri and Ben McCorkle
For English teachers, new media isn’t all that new
This title is open access and free to access on the web A free online version is forthcoming. This open access version made available by Sweetland Digital Rhetoric Collaborative.

Description

In 100 Years of New Media Pedagogy, authors Jason Palmeri and Ben McCorkle set out to find the answer to a seemingly straightforward question: how have English teachers used technology to help them teach through the years? To answer that question, the pair analyze over 750 articles from English Journal spanning the years 1912 to 2012, to demonstrate that teachers have continually taught with the media technologies of their day, and often in surprisingly innovative (and sometimes problematic) ways. Combining tools including interactive graphs, audio and video production, and a good-natured sense of humor to help tell this history, 100 Years of New Media Pedagogy zooms out to identify general patterns across the century and dives in for a closer look at key moments along the timeline.

With several sample assignment descriptions and a list of best pedagogical practices inspired by the people making up this rich history, as well as a list of modern digital production resources, this born-digital book also offers practical advice for the teachers looking to integrate media into their curriculum effectively. This text will lead readers to rethink the role English teachers have played as advocates of new media.

Jason Palmeri is Associate Professor of English at Miami University.

Ben McCorkle is Associate Professor of English at The Ohio State University at Marion.

Praise / Awards

  • 100 Years of New Media Pedagogy functions as a model of what multimodal scholarly texts could and should look like. The authors' emphasis on being playful during both the production and consumption of this text is profound— reminding readers that scholarship can be, should be, fun to produce and consume."-
    -Rochelle (Shelley) Rodrigo, University of Arizona

Product Details

Available worldwide

  • Open Access
  • 2021
  • Forthcoming
  • 978-0-472-99904-0


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Keywords

  • new media, digital media, technology, English, data visualization, multimodality, education, computers and writing, English education, digital literacy, media literacy, multimodal, multimedia, film, audio, television, computer, teaching, pedagogy, distant reading, thin description, media archaeology, digital humanities, digital rhetoric, composition, online learning
     

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