Social Organization in South China, 1911–1949

The Case of Kuan Lineage in K’ai-p’ing County
Yuen-fong Woon
An exploration of the effects on patrilineal kinship ties of the social and political changes in the period between the revolutions of 1912 and 1949

Description

Bridging the collapse of the Confucian state and the establishment of the People’s Republic of China, the period 1911–49 is particularly fascinating to historians, anthropologists, sociologists and political scientists. Unfortunately, it is also a very confusing period, full of shifts and changes in economic, social, and political organizations. The social implications of these changes, and the relationships between officials on the subdistrict level, the unofficial leaders, and the bulk of the peasantry remain inadequately known. South China, which nurtured the Communist Party in its formative years, is a particularly interesting case. In this study I use the Kuan lineage of K’ai-p’ing as a case study to show the effects of demographic, economic, administrative, and educational changes after the Treaty of Nanking (1842) on patrilineal kinship as a principle of social organization in South China. [vii]
Yuen-fong WOON is Professor Emerita of Chinese Society at the University of Victoria.

Product Details

  • 176 pages.
Available worldwide

  • Paper
  • 1984
  • Out of Stock
  • 978-0-89264-048-5

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  • $15.00 U.S.

  • Open Access
  • Available
  • 978-0-472-90223-1

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