Land of Opportunity

One Family's Quest for the American Dream in the Age of Crack
William M. Adler

Description

Part true crime, part work of urban sociology, Land of Opportunity is a meticulously researched account of the rise and fall of the Chambers brothers, who ran a multi-million-dollar crack cocaine operation in Detroit in the 1980s.   Descended from Arkansas sharecroppers, BJ, Larry, and Willie Chambers moved to Detroit seeking economic opportunity, and built a successful drug empire by applying strict business principles to their trade; their business grossed an estimated $55 million annually until the brothers were sent to prison in 1989.  Reading the Chambers brothers in the context of the fall of the Detroit auto-industry and its impact on the city’s economy and residents, Land of Opportunity demonstrates how for the Chambers brothers, crack dealing was a rational career choice; and through the Chambers brothers’ story, Adler provides bottom-up history of late Second Great Migration, deindustrialization, the War on Drugs, and crack era in both Detroit and the United States.

William M. Adler is a freelance writer whose work has appeared in EsquireRolling StoneMother Jones, and the Texas Observer. In addition to Land of Opportunity, he has written two other books of narrative nonfiction: Mollie’s Job, which follows the flight of a single factory job from the US to Mexico over the course of fifty years; and The Man Who Never Died, a biography of the labor martyr Joe Hill.  

Praise / Awards

  • Land of Opportunity is a deep excavation of the economic roots, everyday working, and catastrophic social impacts of the crack cocaine economy in the dual metropolis and its surprising connections to poor Southern black communities. Its thrilling narrative will shock and shake you to rethink the very meaning of the American dream.”
    —Loïc Wacquant, University of California, Berkeley, author of Urban Outcasts: A Comparative Sociology of Advanced Marginality
     
  • “With graceful restraint, Adler shows us that the war on drugs is not a war of the county against those who would bring it down by rejecting its values and grasping at easy money.  It is a war of a country against itself, against its history of racism, against its own values of materialism and lack of concern for all its people. “
    The Washington Post
  • “Relying on countless interviews [. . .] including interviews with the jailed brothers, William M. Adler offers not only an excellent chronicle of the rags-to-riches-to-prison-garb story of these particular entrepreneurs but also a cogent explanation of the social and economic conditions in this country that make dealing drugs an attractive career choice.”
    Chicago Tribune
  • "In this riveting account, William Adler not only tells of how the Chambers brothers moved from small-town rags to big-city riches, but of how ambition meshes with opportunity in a municipality riddled and wrestling with despair.  In telling this tale, Adler informs us about the precariousness of opportunity found in the underground economy of a city struggling for security and identity in the post-industrial era.  It is a story for anyone seeking to understand behavior amidst the tribulations of life in contemporary urban America."
    —Alford A. Young, University of Michigan

Product Details

  • 394 pages.
Available for sale worldwide

  • Ebook
  • 2021
  • Forthcoming
  • 978-0-472-12931-7


Related Products

Due to the current global health event, shipping of print books may be delayed. Actual status will show in the shopping cart.



Pre-Order
  • $29.95 U.S.

nothing
nothing
nothing