Securing the Sacred

Religion, National Security, and the Western State
Robert M. Bosco

Description

Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, Western nations have increasingly recognized religion as a consideration in domestic and foreign policy. In this empirical comparison of the securitization of Islam in Britain, France, and the United States, Robert M. Bosco argues that religion is a category of phenomena defined by the discourses and politics of both religious and state elites.

Despite significant theoretical distinctions between securitization on the domestic and the international levels, he finds that the outcome of addressing religion within the context of security hinges upon partnerships. Whereas states may harness the power of international allies, they cannot often find analogous domestic allies; therefore, states that attempt to securitize religion at home are more vulnerable to counterattack and more likely to abandon their efforts. Securing the Sacred makes a significant contribution to the fields of political theory, international relations, Islamic studies, and security/military studies.

“Framing religion as a national security matter is perilous, as this short but well-argued volume demonstrates. . . Recommended.”
Choice

“Invitingly and lucidly written, the text is accessibly to lay readers and academics alike and will provoke both audiences equally. Robert Bosco’s Securing the Sacred should appear on any syllabus covering religion and politics and is enthusiastically recommended for all scholars of religion and international affairs.”
Critical Research on Religion

Securing the Sacred provides a superb analysis of the post-9/11 interface between religion, national security, and scholarship in Western foreign policy discourse. This is a must read for students and scholars in security studies and the sociology of public policy.”
— Peter Mandaville, George Mason University

Robert M. Bosco is Assistant Professor of International Studies at Centre College.

Praise / Awards

  • "Framing religion as a national security matter is perilous, as this short but well-argued volume demonstrates… Recommended."
    --Choice
  • "Bosco’s Securing the Sacred is the most important book on the politics of secularism to appear since Elizabeth Shakman Hurd’s 2008 volume The Politics of Secularism in International Relations. ... Invitingly and lucidly written, the text is accessibly to lay readers and academics alike and will provoke both audiences equally. Robert Bosco’s Securing the Sacred should appear on any syllabus covering religion and politics and is enthusiastically recommended for all scholars of religion and international affairs."
    --- Critical Research on Religion
  • "This is a fine book, particularly in the light it sheds on the interplay between religion and national security policy in the post-9/11 period."
    --Journal of Church and State
  • "This is an interesting and thought-provoking book that will be of interest to those readers who are interested in how religion and democracy interact, especially when the circumstances of that interaction are affected significantly and suddenly by unexpected events."
    --Democratization

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Product Details

  • 160 pages.
  • 2 tables.
Available for sale worldwide

  • Ebook
  • 2014
  • Available
  • 978-0-472-12009-3


  • PDF: Adobe Digital Editions e-book (DRM Protected)

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Keywords

  • Religion
  • Religion and National Security
  • Islam
  • Religion and International Relations
  • Securitization
  • Religion and the State
  • Secularism
  • War on Terror
  • Religion and International Politics
  • Laicite

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