A Catalogue of Greek Manuscripts at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Volume 1
Nadezhda Kavrus-Hoffmann with the collaboration of Pablo Alvarez
Cataloging the largest of collection of Greek manuscripts in America

Description

A Catalogue of Greek Manuscripts at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor is a comprehensive, fully illustrated catalogue of the largest collection of Greek manuscripts in America, including 110 codices and fragments ranging from the fourth to the nineteenth century. The collection, held in the Special Collections Research Center of the University of Michigan Library, contains many manuscripts from Epirus and the Meteora monasteries built on high pinnacles of rocks in Thessaly. Nadezhda Kavrus-Hoffmann has based the manuscript descriptions on the latest developments in the fields of paleography and codicology, including the newest recommendations of the Institute for Research and History of Texts in Paris. The catalogue includes high-resolution plates of all the manuscripts, allowing researchers to compare the entries with other Greek manuscripts around the world. This catalogue contains a trove of fascinating information related to Byzantine culture that will be available for the first time to scholars working on various disciplines of the humanities such as Classical and Byzantine Studies, Art History, Medieval Studies, Theology, and History.

Nadezhda Kavrus-Hoffmann is an independent scholar.

Pablo Alvarez is Curator of the Special Collections Research Center at the University of Michigan Library.

Product Details

  • 8 1/2 x 11.
  • 304pp.
  • 136 plates.
Available for sale worldwide

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  • Hardcover
  • 2021
  • Forthcoming
  • 978-0-472-13189-1

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  • $99.00 U.S.

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Keywords

  • Byzantine Manuscripts, Greek Paleography, Codicology, Nicholas Anapausas, Meteora Monasteries, Baroness Angela Burdett-Coutts, Greek Bindings, Constantinople, Francis Kelsey

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