The University of Michigan Forum on Health Policy

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1. Cover image for 'The Challenge of Regulating Managed Care'
John E. Billi and Gail B. Agrawal, Editors
A rare insight into the views of major stakeholders in the debate about oversight of the managed-care industry
Format Publication year Price Status Purchasing option
Hardcover 2001 $80.00 Available Add Hardcover for "The Challenge of Regulating Managed Care" to Cart
Ebook 2010 Available View Purchasing Options for Ebook, "The Challenge of Regulating Managed Care"
1. Cover image for 'The Challenge of Regulating Managed Care'
John E. Billi and Gail B. Agrawal, Editors
A rare insight into the views of major stakeholders in the debate about oversight of the managed-care industry
Format Publication year Price Status Purchasing option
Hardcover 2001 $80.00 Available Add Hardcover for "The Challenge of Regulating Managed Care" to Cart
Ebook 2010 Available View Purchasing Options for Ebook, "The Challenge of Regulating Managed Care"
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The American health care system is now a perennial subject of national debate and concern. While it can boast some of the best and most advanced medical care in the world, the health care system in the U.S. also faces difficult issues such as the lack of universal coverage, spiraling costs, the growing needs of senior citizens, and the integration of new technologies.

The University of Michigan Medical School Program in Society and Medicine has been sponsoring the University of Michigan FORUM on Health Policy since 1994 to address these and other salient issues in educational, non-partisan seminars that juxtapose scholars, community experts, policymakers, legislators, and consumers from the university community and across the nation.

We believe that a more reasoned discussion of key issues in health policy development is vital to the overall success of the U.S. health care system. The FORUM and the University of Michigan Press together are taking a leading role in this discussion by making selected FORUM events available to a wider public through the series The University of Michigan Forum on Health Policy.

Read  the complete transcript of the FORUM event, "What the Presidential Candidates are Saying About Health Care Reform" (April 7, 2000).

The University of Michigan Forum on Health Policy

The American health care system is now a perennial subject of national debate and concern. While it can boast some of the best and most advanced medical care in the world, the health care system in the U.S. also faces difficult issues such as the lack of universal coverage, spiraling costs, the growing needs of senior citizens, and the integration of new technologies.

The University of Michigan Medical School Program in Society and Medicine has been sponsoring the University of Michigan FORUM on Health Policy since 1994 to address these and other salient issues in educational, non-partisan seminars that juxtapose scholars, community experts, policymakers, legislators, and consumers from the university community and across the nation.

We believe that a more reasoned discussion of key issues in health policy development is vital to the overall success of the U.S. health care system. The FORUM and the University of Michigan Press together are taking a leading role in this discussion by making selected FORUM events available to a wider public through the series The University of Michigan Forum on Health Policy.

Read  the complete transcript of the FORUM event, "What the Presidential Candidates are Saying About Health Care Reform" (April 7, 2000).


Marilynn M. Rosenthal, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology and Director of the University of Michigan FORUM on Health Policy

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Series Editor

Marilynn M. Rosenthal, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology and Director of the University of Michigan FORUM on Health Policy


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